John BOURLAND
(-Between 1793/1793)
Catherine
(-1826)
Benjamin F. BOURLAND
(1779-1851)
Agnes Nancy McELROY
(Abt 1775-1825)
Col. James G. BOURLAND
(1801-1879)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Catherine WELLS

  • Hannah Ann BOURLAND
  • William Wells BOURLAND
  • Mary J BOURLAND
  • Nancy Jane BOURLAND
  • Virginia "Jennie" Baylis BOURLAND+
  • Sarah Ann BOURLAND+
  • Lorena E. "Lora/Laura" BOURLAND
  • James B. BOURLAND
  • Reece BOURLAND
2. Nancy Salina BARNETT

Col. James G. BOURLAND 14,18,19,29,32,34,40,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,57,58,59,60

  • Born: 11 Aug 1801, Wolf Creek, Pendleton District?, South Carolina, USA 18,50,57,59
  • Marriage (1): Catherine WELLS on 16 Jun 1822 in , Hopkins, Kentucky, USA 34,39,40,41
  • Marriage (2): Nancy Salina BARNETT on 14 May 1854 in , Collin, Texas, USA 42
  • Died: 20 Aug 1879, Dexter, Cooke, Texas, USA at age 78
  • Buried: , Cooke, Texas, USA

   Other names for James were James BOULAND,61 James BOULIN,61 Jas BOURLAND, James BOWLAND 22,61 and James BOWLING.61

  General Notes:

From "BOURLAND, JAMES G." The Handbook of Texas Online. <http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/BB/fbo38.htm l>:

BOURLAND, JAMES G. (1801-1879). James G. Bourland, soldier and state senator, was born in South Carolina on August 11, 1801, to Benjamin and Nancy Bourland. He was married twice, to Catherine Wells and Nancy Salina, and had seven children. He lived in Kentucky and Tennessee, where he traded in slaves and horses, before he moved to what is now Lamar County, Texas, in 1837. He led a volunteer company against Indians in 1841. Later that year he served as second-in-command to William C. Young in another campaign and stayed when Young organized the Third Regiment, Texas Mounted Rifles, for the Mexican War. After serving as a deputy surveyor, he became the collector of customs for the Red River District in 1842 and was elected to the Senate of the First and Second state legislatures. A clash over customs duties with the crew of a United States ship in 1843 led to his being awarded a substantial sum of money by a United States court five years later. After his father, who had also settled in Texas, died in 1851, Bourland invested in a mercantile enterprise and founded a plantation on land now in Cooke County. During the late 1850s he again led a volunteer company against Indians. When the Civil War began, he served as provost marshal for the region in which he resided and in that role directed the investigation that climaxed with the Great Hanging at Gainesville in 1862. Afterward, he was authorized to organize and lead the "Border Regiment," which remained in North Texas although it was in Confederate service, and was later given control of all troops on the northwestern frontier. He was accused of atrocities, in addition to the Great Hanging, but Confederate officials ignored the accusations. After the war ended he received a presidential pardon and was acquitted by a civil court. He subsequently lived in seclusion until his death, on August 20, 1879.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Bourland Family File, Sherman Municipal Library, Sherman, Texas. Richard B. McCaslin, Tainted Breeze: The Great Hanging at Gainesville, Texas (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, 1988). William S. Speer and John H. Brown, eds., Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United States Biographical Publishing, 1881; rpt., Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1978). Rex Wallace Strickland, "History of Fannin County, Texas, 1836-1843," Southwestern Historical Quarterly 33, 34 (April, July 1930)."

Col. James Bourland was the "Float-Senator" in the Texas Senate from the district of Fannin, Red River, and Bowie Counties. 25 Feb, 1846, 1st Session. He served for 4 years.

"During the Mexican War (1846-47), Bourland, along with William C. Young, raised one thousand troops and marched them to San Antonio, where they were mustered in. From " Wright, "Texas in the War...."

In the "Encyclopedia of the New West," ed. by William S. Speer, Marshall Texas: The United States Biographical Pub. County, 1881, it states "When William C. Young raised a regiment [3rd Reg., Texas Mounted Volunteers] for the Mexican war, ... Mr. Bourland was elected lieutenant-colonel, and his brother William Bourland, major. But the war closed about the time they reached the Rio Grande and they never participated in any battle." The Regiment was later surrendered by General E.K. Smith, commanding Trans-Mississippi Department, on 26 May 1865. Also know as the "Texas Border Cavalry Battalion" and later the "Texas Border Cavalry Regiment."

"Among the prominent families of Delaware Bend was Col. James Boreland [sic]... and his son-in-law, Col. A.B. Manion. These two men came with their families to Cooke County several years before the Civil War and located at the upper end of Delaware Bend, which in those days was on the direct route between the East Texas markets and Fort Arbuckle, fifty or sixty miles nearly directly north. Boreland and Manion engaged in the mercantile business and dealt with the soldiers at Fort Arbuckle and the Indians from the north side of Red River. The carried a large stock of merchandise, and also raised much corn and many hogs,, which they sold principally to the government." "Fall Term of Court, 1857: Ordered that James Bourland be appointed presiding officer at all elections for the year 1857 for precinct 3, and the elections to be held at the store or house of James Bourland.

Capt. James Bourland, Commanding Officer of Texas Rangers, Mounted Volunteers. Enlisted 28 Oct, 1858, discharged 28 Apr, 1859. In the Civil War, the "Bourland Texas Cavalry" was organized in early 1863. Col. Bourland commanded a regiment whose duty it was to "protect the North-western frontier against the hostile Indians in the darkest day ever known in that region."

In the cartoon "Texas Lore" by Patrick M. Reynolds, a story is told this way: "During the Civil War, as Sophia Coffee was wining and dining some Yankee scouts at Glen Eden (her plantation in Grayson county,) she heard they were seeking Col. James Bourland, the Confederate leader of Texas' Frontier Defenders. While her guests were busy, Sophia slipped away, swam her horse across the Red River, warned Col. Bourland & helped prevent an invasion of North Texas. Sophia, widow of Holland Coffee, died in 1899. Today their home, Glen Eden, lies beneath Lake Texoma." Sophie was featured in the book "Legendary Ladies of Texas" by Abernathy about ladies of the evening. Researcher Patti Rochette states that a Texas list maker lists Col. James Bourland as a frequent guest.

Information from an unpublished draft manuscript titled NORTHEAST TEXAS PIONEERS 1800-1877, copyright by Skipper Steely, 1989, Paris, Texas: "They moved from Kentucky back to Weakley County, where he owned a race track with Nathaniel Herbert and Albert Early, and apparently bought and sold slaves and horses. James Bourland came to Texas according to land records, in 1836. He surveyed land as a vocation, and sometime in 1837 chose a piece for himself on the North Sulphur River southwest of Roxton. In 1842 he was named as collector of import duties for the Red River District. In 1846 he was elected to represent Fannin, Lamar, Red River and Bowie Counties. He was re-elected for a second term. In 1847 James Bourland also received a land certificate for helping build or survey the Central National Road, which ran through part of the Bourland property. James Bourland served in the Mexican War, and was an incorporator of the Memphis El Paso and Pacific Railroad. By 1853 he had moved to Delaware Bend in Cooke County. In 1858 he raised a company to stop Indian depredations. At the onset of the Civil War, James Bourland served as a member of Young's 11th Texas Regiment, but later organized the 2nd Frontier Regiment, Bourland's Texas Cavalry. In 1862 he was also named provost Marshall of Cooke County. In 1864 Indian problems became very serious, and Bourland led a group in pursuit that fall. Most of all, James Bourland is known for his part in the Gainesville Hangings. He is buried in the Orlena Cemetery."

  Noted events in his life were:

Occupation, Abt 1823, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. He "engaged in buying and selling negroes and horses., carrying them to Alabama and Mississippi and running horses in connection with Nathaniel Harbert and Albert Early."

Resided, Abt 1823, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA.

Land, Between 1827 and 1833, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. 137 acres, on the Middle Fork, Obion

Occupation, Abt 1829, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. 34 "He then moved to Weakley county, Tennessee, and there engaged in buying and selling negroes and horses, carrying them to Alabama and Mississippi, and running horses in connection with Nathaniel Harbert and Albert Early."

Resided, Abt 1829, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. "They moved from Kentucky back to Weakley County, where he owned a race track with Nathaniel Herbert and Albert Early, and apparently bought and sold slaves and horses."

Tax Roll, 1829, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. Bourland, James
Land--25 [acres]
Free People--1

Fact 1, 8 Jun 1829, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. Purchase of slave:

A/329 8 Jun 1829 $100.00 Pers. Prob.
John Baker of Weakley to James Bourland of same.
Boy Sam about 15 years old.
Signed: John Baker
Wit: William Rachels, Joseph (x) Cravens
Proven: Jul 1829 by 2 wits Rec: 24 Aug 1829

Tax Roll, 1830, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. Bourland, James
Land--25 [acres]
Free People--1
Slaves--1

Court, 25 Feb 1830, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. B/180/181 25 Feb 1830 $200.00 19 1/2 Acres
Daniel Delaney of Weakley to Cullen and Willie Bayless of same.
....
Wit: James Bourland....
Proven: Jan 1832 by 2 wits Rec: 8 Feb 1832

Court, 8 May 1830, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. B/34, 35 8 May 1830 $1.00 Deed of Trust
...in County Court Johnson recovered against Bowers for $so3.00 with
James Bourland as security....

Tax Roll, 1831, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. James Bourland
Land--25 [acres]
Slaves--1

Fact 2, 23 Nov 1831, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. Purchase of slave:
B/153, 154 23 Nov 1832 [sic] $800 Pers. Prop.
Joseph Waldrop to John W. Cook and James Bourland
Girl Jinny and her child, name unknown; boys James and Tom
Signed: Joseph Waldrop
Wit: David Shultz, John Seratt*
Proven: Jan 1832 by 1* wit Rec: 11 Jan 1832

Tax Roll, 1832, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. James Bourland
Land--25 [acres]
Free People--1
Slaves--3

Land, 2 Jan 1832, , Calloway, Kentucky, USA. 62,63 Deed from John Irvan to James Bowling.

Recorded 28 July 1832, Deed Book A, Page 322.

Land, 26 Jan 1833, , Calloway, Kentucky, USA. 64 "Deed of Mortgage from James Bowland to J. L. Caldwell"
"...I, James Boulin...."
"...I, Bowling...."
"...I, James Bouland..."

Land, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, , , Republic of Texas. Listed as Delta even though Delta County did not exist in 1836 in the state of Texas. It was not founded until 1870.

Certificate No. 199
1280 Acres
Red River Land District
File No. 16

Land, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. Listed as Fannin even though Fannin County did not exist in 1836 in the state of Texas. It was not founded until 1837.

Certificate No.199
640 Acres
Fannin Land District
File No. 292

Land, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. Listed as Lamar even though Lamar County did not exist in 1836 in the state of Texas. It was not founded until 1840.

Certificate No. 199
640 Acres
Lamar Land District
File No. 112

Land, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, , Montague, Republic of Texas. Listed as Montague even though Montague County did not exist in 1836 in the state of Texas. It was not founded until 1857.

Certificate No. 2458/3559
1184 Acres
Fannin Land District
File No. 374

Occupation, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, Red River Valley, Republic of Texas. 34 "Meeting with adversities in fortune, he cam to Texas, prospecting for a new country to start in business again. Here he found northern Texas settled to where Paris is now; no one living there but Colonel G. W. Wright and Claiborn Chisholm.

Resided, Between 2 Mar 1836 and 1 Oct 1837, Red River Valley, Republic of Texas. 60 He "settled in the Red River Valley in Texas during the Republic of Texas".

Resided, Abt 1837, , , Republic of Texas. "Meeting with adversities in fortune, he came to Texas, prospecting for a new country to start in business again. Here he found northern Texas settled to where Paris is now; no one living there but Colonel G. W. Wright and Claiborn Chisholm."

Resided, 1837, , , Republic of Texas. "Apparently sometime in 1837 Bourland chose a piece of land for himself on the North Sulphur River, southwest of present day Roxton and northease of Ladonia...."

Resided, 1837, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. 65,66 James Bourland is listed as coming to Lamar County in 1837.

Resided, 1838, , , Republic of Texas. "He settled near Paris then moved to the North Sulphur River south of Honey Grove."

Resided, 1839, , Red River, Republic of Texas.

Military, 1840s, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. He "skirmished with Indians...in southern Fannin County near Fort Lyday...."

Occupation, Abt 1840, Paris, Lamar, Republic of Texas. "Here he engaged in surveying, having a deputyship after one year's service."

Resided, Abt 1840, Paris, Lamar, Republic of Texas. 67 "The citizens of the county as I remember them were: Colonel James and Bill Bourland...."

Residence, 1840, , Red River, Republic of Texas. 53

Court, 18 Sep 1840, , Red River, Republic of Texas. "Articles of Agreement
18 Sept 1840
T B Chapin and James Bourland.
Bourland binding self for $4000 to survey and pay expenses on Certif of Chapin (4,506 acres)."

Occupation, 29 Sep 1840, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. "...land in Fannin County surveyed by James Bourland, Dep Survyor....

Court, Dec 1840, , Red River, Republic of Texas. "Petitions To Form Lamar County"
Signed: ...James Bourland....

Military, 1841, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. 68 "Indian fighting came into the story of the northeast Texas region at an early day. After maraudings by the natives, minute men, already authorized by an act of Congress gathered in the Fannin County region. Among the officers whom the volunteers chose was Captain James Bourland, surveyor, plantation owner, and Indian trader, destined to serve in the senate of Texas and to lead a frontier regiment during the Civil War."

Resided, Abt 1841, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. " He found a country on North Sulphur, south of Honey Grove, where settled, having many encounters with the Indians, one in which John B. Denton was killed. James Bourland was the first man to pick him up."

Texas Ranger, 1841, , , Republic of Texas. Texas Ranger. He was Captain of a Company on the headwaters of the Trinity River.
He participated at the Battle of Village Creek, supposedly being the first person to pick up John B. Denton after he was killed...."

See http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/btv01

Texas Ranger, Feb 1841, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. "In February 1841 the Texas congress appropriated $8000 for the maintenance of a frontier battalion. The men were paid a dollar a day while in service. James Bourland was a member and campaigned against marauding Indians. During these skirmishes with the Indians he was made a captain. Later at a meeting at Fort Inglish with 400 to 500 men present, Captain Bourland was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel."

Texas Ranger, Apr 1841, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "Wiley Brigham...joined Capt. James Bourland's Company of more than sixty men in April, 1841. They made up part of a task force under Gen. Edward H. Tarrant that pursued the Indians to Wise County, near Bridgeport, Texas."

Texas Ranger, May 1841, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. 69 In "the company commanded by Gen. Tarrant at the fight with the Indians in which Capt. John B. Denton was killed" were James Bourland, Billiam Bourland, Mac Bourland...."

Texas Ranger, 24 May 1841, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. "At this time Capt. James B. Denton and Capt. Henry Stout were on a scouting tour when Denton was shot and killed. Bourland was the first man to reach them after both of them had been wounded after a raid on some 275 lodges at a camp of over 1,000 Indians had been cleaned out."

Land, 9 Dec 1841, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 70 Abstract #67 - Bourland, J
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Bourland, James
P-Dt: 09 Dec 1841
Dist/Class: Red River 2nd
File#: 16
Patent#: 80
Patent Vol.: 1
Certificate: 92
Acres: 640
Maps: 41

Land, 9 Dec 1841, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 70 Abstract #66 - Bourland, J
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Bourland, James
P-Dt: 09 Dec 1841
Dist/Class: Red River 2nd
File#: 16
Patent#: 79
Patent Vol.: 1
Certificate: 92
Acres: 640
Maps: 33, 41

Occupation, 1842, , , Republic of Texas. "President Houston gave him the collectorship of duties up and down Red river to the Louisiana line. Here he had some trouble with the United States government, wherein they tied him and forced the goods out of his custom house, for which the United States paid Texas twenty-six thousand dollars...."

Occupation, 1842, Red River Valley, Republic of Texas. 60 He was appointed collector of customs for the Red River District in 1842.

Tax Roll, 1842, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. 71 Tax Payer - Bourland James
White Polls - 1
Taxed Property - 640 [ac]; 2 slaves 10-60; 640 ac assignee of Thomas Chisum; 320 ac assignee of Seth Swinford

Occupation, 6 Mar 1842, , Bowie, Republic of Texas. "Page 263 Performance Bond
James Bourland, as principal, and W N Porter, E Early, A J Fowler, B F Bourland, John T Griffin, I T Hamner(?), and John S Porter as securities, are bound to Pres of Repub of TX, $25,000 for performance of Bourland as Collector of Import duties in district of Red River, 6 Mar 1842. Ack before Jas N Smith, Chief Jus Bowie Co, TX."

Court, 1843-1848, , , Republic of Texas. "A clash over customs duties with the crew of a United States ship in 1843 led to his being awarded a substantial sum of money by a United States court five years later."

Court, 13 Mar 1843, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "Know all men by these presents that I, James Bourland of the County of Lamar & Republic of Texas am held and firmly bound unto John Wm. Wither of the county & Republic aforesaid in the full sum of ($200) two hundred dollars...."

Land, 13 Mar 1843, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "...I, James Bourland of the County of Lamar & Republic of Texas am held and firmly bound...."
Sells land to John W. Wither.

Court, 20 Jun 1843, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "Know all men by these present that I, John Cox..., do hereby nominate constitute and appoint James Bourland and William H. Bourland both of the county and Republic aforesaid, my true and lawful attorneys in fact...."

Fact 3, 1 Oct 1843, Clarksville, Red River, Republic of Texas. 72 "letters left at Post Office"

Bourland, James

Resided, 1 Oct 1843, Clarksville, Red River, Republic of Texas.

Fact 4, 12 Dec 1844, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "race over the Dayton Grove Track -- A match race for $1,000 a side between Alfred Bailes' horse and James Bourland's horse Berkshire Boar, will come off at the Dayton Grove Track, one mile and a half from town on Friday"

Fact 5, 26 Dec 1844, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "The quarter race between the Barkshire Boar and Rackamaroleon, for $1,000 a side, came off on Saturday last. Rackamaroleon kept the lead for about two hundred yards, when the Boar came up and passed him with great ease, and passed the judges' stand some 30 or 40 feet ahead, under a light rein. We understand that Mr. Bailes, the loser of the race, has since purchased the Boar.

Land, 9 May 1845, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 73 Abstract #468 - Heath, W
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Heath, William
P-Dt: 09 May 1845
Dist/Class: Fannin 1st
File#: 183
Patent#: 170
Patent Vol.: 12
Certificate: 396
Acres: 1276.05
Maps: 37

Court, 14 Aug 1845, , Fannin, Republic of Texas. Witnessed a land bond between John Thompson to Prier Herrin. "Jas Bourland"

Court, 24 Dec 1845, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. "notice by J. Long, Clerk of the District Court of Lamar County, of service by publication in action for a debt of $840, styled Alexander Mabane, ...as executors of the Estate of L. W. Tinnan against...James Bourland....

Mexican War, 1846, Red River Valley, Republic of Texas. 60 "On the outbreak of the Mexican War he helped William C. Young raise a regiment of 1,000 volunteers in the Red River area. Bourland was appointed its lieutenant colonel."

Mexican War, 1846, San Antonio, Bexar, Republic of Texas. "General Taylor called for aid while fighting near Matamoras, so Colonel W. C. Young and Colonel James Bourland collected one thousand men and marched to San Antonio and there mustered into service all except our colonels. Colonel Bourland went to Matamoras to get mustered into service. So General Taylor ordered him back to San Antonio, as General Wool would be there and attend to that part of the command. Before General Wool arrived, Colonel Harney took the regiment and four companies of dragoons and crossed the Rio Grande at Procedia del Norte without orders. General Wool ordered him back and to give up the regiment to Colonel W. C. Young and Colonel James Bourland...."
====================
"They were called 'The Dragons'."

Mexican War, 1846, San Antonio, Bexar, Republic of Texas. 74 "An associate with Young for many years, the pair led men from the Red River region in 1849 to San Antonio for Mexican War service. Bourland briefly ended up in Matamoras as part of an envoy presenting General Zachary Taylor with a list of grievances by Texans. However...he then returned to San Antonio and served under Young."

Poll Tax, 1846, , Lamar, Texas, USA.

Residence, 1846, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 53

Election, Feb 1846, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 60 He served as a state senator in the First and Second Legislatures of the State of Texas.

Election, 16 Feb 1846, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 75 Col. James Bourland was the "Float-Senator" in the Texas Senate from the district of Fannin, Red River, and Bowie Counties. 25 Feb, 1846, 1st Session. He served for 4 years.

"James Bourland, from Fannin, Lamar, Red River and Bowie."

Election, 25 Feb 1846, , Fannin, Texas, USA. "Bourland's military time was short, and after his return to the Red River region he was elected to the Texas Senate for the second time, representing Bowie, Fannin, Lamar, and Red River Counties."

Land, 23 Jun 1846, , Weakley, Tennessee, USA. "Page 440
THOMAS WINSTON
For twenty-five dollars in hand paid, for two hundred acres of land, beginning on J. Bourland's northwest corner...."

Land, 1847, , Lamar, Republic of Texas. " In 1847 James Bourland also received a land certificate for helping build or survey the Central National Road, which ran through part of the Bourland property. "

Court, 27 Feb 1847, , Lamar, Texas, USA. "legal notice in Lamar County District Court in action entitled Alexander Mabane...executors of Estate of L. W. Tinnin against...James Bourland....; notice given by Jacob Long, Clerk of Court, by Sheriff Reddin.

Election, Nov 1847, , Lamar, Texas, USA. After the Mexican War "Colonel Bourland returned home, was elected to the State senate and served his time out...."

Election, 6 Nov 1847, , Red River, Texas, USA. "...election news in Red River County and Titus...Floating Senator: Bourland"

Resided, 8 Jan 1848, Clarksville, Red River, Texas, USA. Letters left at Clarksville post office...James Bourland

Occupation, 25 Mar 1848, , Lamar, Texas, USA. "notice to Christopher Brooks by Sheriff Reddin Russel of Lamar County, by his deputy F. Miles, that a suit has been filed against him by Henry G. McDonald regarding land in Lamar County...on land surveyed by James Bourland, Deputy surveyor."

Election, 5 Aug 1848, , Lamar, Texas, USA. "Mass Meeting to be held in Paris of Lamar Democrats. Ladies especially infited; barbecue and speech by Elector William C. Young by Committee of: ... W. H. Bourland,... James Bourland, ... Parker S. Doss."

Fact 6, After 1848, , Fannin, Texas, USA. "After the Mexican War James returned to Fannin County where he had left his land under the care of a son-on-law Sam Day."

Occupation, 1850. Farmer

Residence, 1850, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 50 Precinct 4

Census 1850 - free, 8 Nov 1850, , Lamar, Texas, USA. Line #16, Family #198 Precinct # 4

Land, 18 May 1852, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 76 Abstract #70 - Brown, M
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Brown, Matthew
P-Dt: 18 May 1852
Dist/Class: Fannin 3rd
File#: 601
Patent#: 968
Patent Vol.: 6
Certificate: 96
Acres: 421
Maps: 46

Fact 7, Abt 1853, Delaware Bend, Cooke, Texas, USA. "James Bourland...was an incorporator of the Memphis El Paso and Pacific Railroad."

Occupation, 1853, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, USA. 77 "New establishments in 1853 were Bourland and Manion, dry goods...."

Resided, 1853, Delaware Bend, Cooke, Texas, USA. " By 1853 he had moved to Delaware Bend in Cooke County."

Fact 8, 7 Feb 1853, Paris, Lamar, Texas, USA. 78 "February 7, 1853, a charter was granted by Texas legislature to James Bourland [and others]...in the name of the Memphis and El Paso and Pacific railroad. These men were given the fight to locate, construct and maintain a railroad commencing on Red River...[to] at or near El Paso...."
"Bourland and Young and their associates were to form and organize a company and serve as directors until the stockholders held an election."

Land, 27 Apr 1854, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 70 Abstract #69 - Bourland, J
P'ee: Grant, M M
G'ee: Bourland, James
P-Dt: 27 Apr 1854
Dist/Class: Lamar 2nd
File#: 112
Patent#: 621
Patent Vol.: 3
Acres: 640
Maps: 29

Land, 5 Feb 1855, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 76 Abstract #62 - Bourland, J.
P'ee: Bean, Thomas C
G'ee: Bourland, James
P-Dt: 05 Feb 1855
Dist/Class: Fannin 2nd
File#: 292
Patent#: 693
Patent Vol.: 3
Acres: 640
Maps: 23, 24

Occupation, 1856, Bourland's Bend of the Red River, Cooke, Texas, USA. 60 In 1856 he was conducting a general store in Bourland's Bend of the Red River in Cooke County in partnership with Austin Brooks.

Occupation, 1856, Delaware Bend, Cooke, Texas, USA. "...he began a general store along with his own farming interests."

Resided, Abt 1856, , Cooke, Texas, USA. "James moved to Cooke County north of Gainesville in a place known as the Delaware Bend of the Red River. There he engaged in business as well as overseeing his large land holdings."

Resided, Abt 1856, Delaware Bend, Cooke, Texas, USA. When his State Senate term was over he "moved to Cooke county and opened a farm in Delaware Bend; here he remained until an ordinance of secession was passed by the State...."

Court, Fall 1857, , Cooke, Texas, USA. Fall Term of Court, 1857. "Ordered by the court that James Bourland be appointed presiding officer at all elections for the year 1857 for precinct, and the elections to be held at the store or house of James Bourland."

Resided: Cooke County, Texas, 1857. 79

Election, Jul 1857, , Cooke, Texas, USA. 80 "Appointment of election judges in July, 1857, revealed thee were then six voting places in the county...James T. [sic] Bourland [at his home]."

Membership, 22 Jan 1858, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, USA. 81,82 Ancient Free and Accepted Masons.
16th Masonic District of Texas which included Cooke county.
James Bourland, J. D. (Junior Deacon), Master Mason is listed as one of the originial 34 members of the Gainesville lodge No. 210 in 1858.

Military active duty, 28 Oct 1858, , , Republic of Texas. 83,84 "In the Fall of 1858, Bourland was ordered by Governor Hardin Richard Runnells to raise a company of men to stop Indian depredations. The group was stationed between the Trinity and Red Rivers, but a larger command...replaced it in late November."

Texas Ranger, 28 Oct 1858-28 Apr 1859, , , Texas, USA. "Capt. James Bourland, Commanding Officer of Texas Rangers, Mounted Volunteers. Enlisted 28 Oct, 1858, discharged 28 Apr, 1859."

Fact 9, 1859-1860, , Lamar, Texas, USA. 1859--Bourland fails to find the temporary burying place of John B. Denton.
1860--Bourland assists a Chisum party of men and finds the bones of Denton.

Occupation, Bef 1860, , Cooke, Texas, USA. "Boreland and Manion engaged in the mercantile business and dealt with the soldiers at Fort Arbuckle and the Indians from the north side of Red River. The carried a large stock of merchandise, and also raised much corn and many hogs,, which they sold principally to the government."

Resided, Bef 1860, , Cooke, Texas, USA. "Among the prominent families of Delaware Bend was Col. James Boreland [sic]... And his son-in-law, Col. A.B. Manion. These two men came with their families to Cooke County several years before the Civil War and located at the upper end of Delaware Bend, which in those days was on the direct route between the East Texas markets and Fort Arbuckle, fifty or sixty miles nearly directly north."

Residence, 1860, , Cooke, Texas, USA. 57,60 The 1860 census of Cooke County lists him as a fifty-seven-year-old farmer.

Civil War, Between 1861 and 1865, , Red River, Texas, CSA. "In the cartoon "Texas Lore" by Patrick M. Reynolds, a story is told this way: "During the Civil War, as Sophia Coffee was wining and dining some Yankee scouts at Glen Eden (her plantation in Grayson county,) she heard they were seeking Col. James Bourland, the Confederate leader of Texas' Frontier Defenders. While her guests were busy, Sophia slipped away, swam her horse across the Red River, warned Col. Bourland & helped prevent an invasion of North Texas. Sophia, widow of Holland Coffee, died in 1899. Today their home, Glen Eden, lies beneath Lake Texoma." Sophie was featured in the book "Legendary Ladies of Texas" by Abernathy about ladies of the evening. Researcher Patti Rochette states that a Texas list maker lists Col. James Bourland as a frequent guest."

Civil War, Between 1861 and 1865, Preston, Grayson, Texas, CSA. 60 Upon the secession of Texas Bourland returned to military service and subsequently commanded a regiment organized for the protection of the northern frontier of Texas against marauding Indians and federal guerrillas. Units of his regiment were stationed on the Red River, principally at Preston in Grayson County and at old Warren in Fannin County.

Occupation, Between Feb 1861 and Feb 1862, Texas, CSA. "Bourland's 56 day service as commissioner to the Indians would have taken place sometime after the secession of Texas in Feb.1861 and prior to 26 Feb.1862 when he appointed attorney JM Perry to collect payment from State of Texas. There is no memorandum on the voucher information in the Texas State archives when the actual 56 day service occurred except a letter (Sept.3rd.1862 Gainesville, TX.) from Bourland to Texas Comptroller DR Johns in which he states that the actual duration may be verified from the Days charged by Harrison & Hamilton. Actually this letter would in addition date the service sometime prior to Sept.1862)

It is probable Harrison & Hamilton were also engaged as commissioners to the Indians with Bourland at this time and applied for payment from the State of Texas also.

FYI...It was common for all with funds due from the State of Texas to engage an attorney for collection. Affidavits, rolls etc. were required for verification prior to payment.

The actual warrants made out to Bourland would be dated sometime after Feb.1862.
20-1s 20.00
10-21/2 25.00
11-5s 55.00
8-10s 80.00
5-20s 100.00
$280.00

These 54 warrants were not cancelled and returned to the State of Texas. If any have survived they are in someone's personal collection."

Land, 6 Jun 1861, , Cooke, Texas, CSA. "J Bolin"

Land, 14 Aug 1861, , Montague, Texas, CSA. 85 Abstract #148 - Crawford, R
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Crawford, Robert
P-Dt: 14 Aug 1861
Dist/Class: Fannin Donation
File#: 1012
Patent#: 109
Patent Vol.: 3
Certificate: 705
Acres: 440
Maps: 7

Fact 10, Dec 1861, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, CSA. 86 "This [Dr. Samuel Ligon's] was the first frame house ever built north or west of Gainesville and was quite a mansion for those days.... A 'get-acquainted' party held by Charles Gooding...was given during Christmas week, 1861, and people up and down the river were invited....The...Bourlands came from the lower bends of the river...."

Civil War, 1862, , Cooke, Texas, CSA. 60 " In 1862 he was also named provost Marshall of Cooke County."

Fact 11, 1862, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, CSA. 87 "Col. Bourland was a large land owner in the Delaware Bend and Walnut Bend section of the county."

Civil War, Sep 1862, , Lamar, Texas, CSA. 88 James Bourland...[and others] met in Gainesville to plan an operation that would smell out the conspirators' intentions.

Fact 12, Oct 1862, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, CSA. 89 See "GREAT HANGING AT GAINESVILLE" in the online Handbook of Texas.
http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/jig01

"An understanding of Bourland's background is an understanding of the Gainesville Hangings, if they can be at all comprehensible. He was a tough pioneer who might have manufactured, or helped at least encourage, the stories of a take over by the Unionists. For sure, he took advantage of the situation when it arose, doing his best to rid the Red River Valley of the Union loyalists. In fairness to Cooke County, violence did go on elsewhere. Besides the hangings at Tarrant in Hopkins County, five were strung up in Wise County, and one died at the hands of citizens in Denton. There were arrests in Grayson County, but no hangings. In the not so far away Hill Country near Comfort, Texas, 68 German immigrants were massacred by militia because of their Union loyalties. Compassion and understanding, not to mention debate on viewpoints, were lacking in the vocabulary of the day."

See also a description on pages 34-38 in "The First 100 Years In Cooke County."

Civil War, 2 Oct 1862, , Grayson, CSA. Though harsh with his language, Bourland was assumably an effective leader. However, more than that, his trading with the Chickasaw Indians made him valuable on the northern frontier of Texas as a Confederate officer during the Civil War. Initially, he was a member of Young's Eleventh Texas Regiment.
On October 2, 1862, he organized companies at Camp Reeves in Grayson County. Later, he placed his border service regiment of state troops [Second Frontier Regiment, Bourland's Texas Cavalry] up and down the Red River when the war started, protecting the homes to the west of Fannin County until the Confederate government could organize." In 1862, Colonel Bourland was the provost marshal of the local military command in Cooke County. He was 61 years old at that time, but still to serve as a guard on the frontier border."

Civil War, 1863, , Red River, Texas, CSA. "In the Civil War, the "Bourland Texas Cavalry" was organized in early 1863. Col. Bourland commanded a regiment whose duty it was to "protect the North-western frontier against the hostile Indians in the darkest day ever known in that region."

Military, 1864, Texas, CSA. 90 "One Fox, a renegade, and Parnell, a Union sympathizer, led a gang of robbers in Wise and Denton Counties. Colonel James Bourland wih his regiment drove them out of that region...In the fall of 1864 Colonel James Bourland, commanding a Confederate regiment in North Texas sent a contingent of troops to Camp Colorado, evidently in search of deserters...."

Military Service, Fall 1864, , Cooke, Texas, CSA. "In 1864 Indian problems became very serious, and Bourland led a group in pursuit that fall."

Civil War, 2 Jun 1865, Galveston, Galveston, Texas, CSA. "...it is known that Col. James Bourland, representative of the Northern Sub-District of Texas, signed the Jun 2, 1865 Confederate surrender in Galveston."

Court, After 1865, , Cooke, Texas, USA. "After the war ended he received a presidential pardon and was acquitted by a civil court."

Military, Abt 1867, , Cooke, Texas, USA. After the second year's war he "organized a regiment for border purposes, placing his men up and down Red river for home protection. He had some skirmishes with the Indians."

Fact 13, 27 Apr 1868, , Cooke, Texas, USA. 91 James Bourland had a "B" cattle brand.

Residence, 1870, , Cooke, Texas, USA. 51 Precinct 2

Census 1870, 10 Nov 1870, Gainesville, Cooke, Texas, USA. P. 28, Line #23, Family #178

Death2 (conflicting), 1873.

Land, 28 Apr 1873, , Fannin, Texas, USA. 92 Abstract #249 - Cromwell, A H/Hawley, H
P'ee: Bourland, James
G'ee: Cromwell, A H and Hawley, H
P-Dt: 28 Apr 1873
Dist/Class: Fannin Scrip
File#: 1334
Patent#: 139
Patent Vol.: 20
Certificate: 14
Acres: 320
Maps: 46

Land, 17 Jun 1873, , Cooke, Texas, USA. Sold 160 acres, another 160 acres, 117 acres, and 43 acres to James M Peery.

Land, 25 Jul 1887, , Montague, Texas, USA. 93 Abstract #1138 - Burnes, W T
P'ee: Bourlan [sic], James
G'ee: Burnes, W T
P-Dt: 25 Jul 1887
Dist/Class: Fannin Preemption
File#: 2647
Patent#: 20
Patent Vol.: 20
Acres: 113.80
Maps: 35


James married Catherine WELLS, daughter of William WELLS and Virginia BAYLIS?, on 16 Jun 1822 in , Hopkins, Kentucky, USA 34,39,40.,41 (Catherine WELLS was born about 1803 in , Weakley, Tennessee, USA and died in 1845 in , Lamar, Texas, USA.)


James next married Nancy Salina BARNETT on 14 May 1854 in , Collin, Texas, USA.42 (Nancy Salina BARNETT was born in 1825 in , , Tennessee, USA and died before 1879.)




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